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NCRonline.org Reviews What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia

A new review of What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia appears in NCRonline.org. Spoiler: It's a good one.

"Elizabeth Catte's What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia is a detailed critique of recent discourse about Appalachia that skillfully draws on history. Catte, too, is a historian, but her book is less a history of Appalachia and more of a history of the stories told about Appalachia that demonstrates how these long-held myths have always obscured more than they reveal. Catte sets out to challenge the predominant view of Appalachia as culturally, ethnically and politically homogeneous, largely in response to Hillbilly Elegy, but also to recent media coverage of the region. Though not a memoir, Catte writes from her own experience of Appalachia. The book not only debunks Appalachian stereotypes, but provides deeper and more insightful analysis — and a stronger call to action — than most Appalachian writers."

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Folktales and Legends In Small Press Bookwatch

Folktales and Legends In Small Press Bookwatch

Midwest Book Review's May 2018 issue of their online book review magazine "Small Press Bookwatch" features a review of Belt's "Folktales and Legends of the Middle West". Read below or click here. The Folktale/Fairytale Shelf Folktales and Legends of the Middle West Edward McClelland, author David Wilson, illustrator Belt Publishing 9780998018812, $20.00, PB, 200pp Synopsis: Most people aren't aware that America's first superheroes lived in the Midwest! There was Nanabozho, the Ojibway man-god who conquered the King of Fish, took control of the North Wind, and inspired Longfellow's The Song of Hiawatha. Paul Bunyan, the larger-than-life North Woods lumberjack, created...

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What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia in The Observer

What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia in The Observer

West Virginia's The Observer takes a look at Elizabeth Catte's What You Are Getting Wrong About Appalachia.

"The book has been described as a spirited rebuttal of J.D. Vance’s Hillbilly Elegy, and its depiction of a homogenous Scots-Irish culture of people almost fated to remain behind as America progresses. But Catte’s succinct polemic is about much more, including an overview of iconic episodes of Appalachian political activism and an examination of historically significant authors like Harry Caudill (Night Comes to the Cumberlands) who have drawn attention to problems like poverty while sometimes promoting regional stereotypes." 

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Week in review: New books from the printer, parachute journalists, yinz & youse

Week in review: New books from the printer, parachute journalists, yinz & youse

It's a cool and sunny day across the Rust Belt. As we gear up for another week, catch up on last week's news:  "The Washington Post, which has 25 correspondents in 18 bureaus around the world, has no bureau in the Midwest." We love this comprehensive and thoughtful article from American Prospect on the perils of parachute journalism. Belt gets a shoutout, too.  The Voices from the Rust Belt tour visited Cincinnati and Columbus this week. Dan Hurley interviewed Belt editor and founder Anne Trubek on WVXU's program "Cincinnati Edition." Dan and Anne talk about the new book, Studs Terkel, and why Cincinnati and Cleveland have...

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Our TV Guide - Belt Pub and "Roseanne"

What do Roseanne Barr, JD Vance, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Belt Publishing have in common? We're all featured in this article from Salon.com on the dangers of the "single story" in Trump's America. Erin Keane writes, "The danger of all single stories is how they flatten their subjects, reducing the complexities of a people and a place to easily digestible narratives, then in turn demand the people themselves conform to those narratives."  Voices from the Rust Belt, she argues, is one force combatting the generalizations of Midwestern working class families that "Roseanne" can't seem to escape. Keane gives snapshots of some of the anthology's best essays, from John Lloyd Clayton's "fond ode to a...

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